Memory

10/18/2011

0 Comments

 
Prepared by Paul John P. Lanic
B.S. Psychology - University of Santo Tomas
(October 2011)



WHAT IS MEMORY?
Ψ     The process of bringing back to mind or consciousness the images of past sensory experiences.
Ψ     Storage of mental images or information
Ψ     It does not project images (but is capable of doing so).
Ψ     “Retained information”.

TYPES OF MEMORY (Reber et. al, 2009)
      Associative memory – label for any memory system that is hypothesized to rest on the notion of an association.
      Declarative memory – conscious memory that one can communicate or declare to others.
      Echoic memory – residual sensory memory which lasts for about 2-3 seconds after a brief auditory stimulus.

      Episodic memory – a form of memory in which information is stored with ‘mental tags’ about when, where, and how it was picked up.
      Explicit memory – conscious memory for material of which one is aware.
      Fact memory – memory for specific facts, events or other information carried in a message.
      False memory – memory for events that did not happen.
      Flashbulb memory – very clear and poignant memories consisting of the exact details of an event, where one was, what one was doing, who was there, etc. as the event occurred or as stimuli are present; high level of emotional arousal must be present in order for such sharp memories to be formed.
      Implicit memory – unconscious memory for a material of which one is unaware but still affects the person’s functioning.
      Inaccessible memory – term used for any memory that is not actually lost but cannot, for any number of reasons, be retrieved.
      Lexical memory – memory for words per se, not their meanings.
      Long-term memory – memory for information that has been well processed and integrated into one’s general knowledge
      Motor memory – memory for motor actions and skills.
      Noetic memory – Endel Tulving’s term for memory of general facts.
      Procedural memory – memory for procedures or complex activities that have become highly automatized and are acted out without conscious thought about their processes.
      Semantic memory – memory for meanings.
      Sensory memory – memory for a specific stimulus input, the material as it was sensed.
      Short-term memory – memory for information that has received minimal processing or interpretation.

FUNCTIONS/ ACTIVITIES DURING MEMORY PROCESS
1.       conservation/ retention – the process of holding into or retaining a thing.
2.       recall – process of retrieving information from memory
3.       recognition – awareness that an object or event is one that has been previously seen, experienced or learned.

TYPES OF RECOGNITION
     
Perfect or definite recognition – one is able to identify every detail of an information
     
Imperfect or indefinite recognition – one is unable to identify everything; but this can be converted to definite recognition through recall.

PROCESSES INVOLVED IN MEMORY

  
Reintegrative memory
        o   forming whole and complex form of specific knowledge and experience
        o   repressed experiences may be produced to form a non – threatening memory without it (traumatic experiences are unconsciously forgotten).

  
Recall
         o   bringing back to consciousness what has been learned

  
Relearning
         o   formation of new cognitive structures from the past learning





Leave a Reply.