Prepared by Paul John P. Lanic
B.S. Psychology - University of Santo Tomas
(October 2011)


WHAT IS INTELLIGENCE? 

  • It is the sum total of all cognitive processes and skills of an individual.
  • It is the ability to understand abstract concepts, see relationships among objects and ideas, and use knowledge in a meaningful way.
  • Intelligence is also the flexibility or versatility of an individual to adjust to new situations.

THEORIES OF INTELLIGENCE
Francis Galton’s Theory of Intelligence
            Ø  Intelligence provides basis for specific ability that every individual possesses.
            Ø  Galton believed that intellectual ability is inherited.
            Ø  The person who is intelligent is likely to develop mechanical, artistic, musical, linguistic and mathematical abilities. 

Albert Binet’s Theory of Intelligence
            Ø  Intelligence is the general ability to solve problems in different situations.
            Ø  He based his assumptions that good students have the tendency to perform all the tasks included in the Binet-Simon Scale, while poor students tend to do poorly on all tasks.


Spearman’s Theory of Intelligence (1904)
             Ø  He found that scores on a given tasks correlates highly with one another.
§  Positive Manifold – leads to a large 1st factor derived from factor analysis, dubbed general intelligence, or “g”.

§  The Principle of Indifference of the Indicator – it is unimportant indicator which particular test are used to asses general intelligence – they all intercorrelate highly anyway.

Thurston’s Theory
         Ø  He is best noted for his pioneering work in the area of intelligence.
         Ø  He identified 7 factors of intelligence; The Primary Mental Abilities:
                     §  reasoning
                     §  word fluency
                     §  perceptual speed
                     §  verbal comprehension
                     §  associative memory
                     §  spatial visualization
                     §  numerical calculation

The TriarchicTheory of Intelligence
         Ø  Developed by Robert Sternberg in 1984.
         Ø  3 types of abilities in intelligence:
                     §  Componential intelligence – verbal reasoning and abilities
                     §  Experiential intelligence – ability to combine experiences through insight to solve  problems.
                     §  Contextual intelligence – the ability to adjust & function other than school and daily social situations.
         Ø  In 1985, Sternberg has developed a theory of intelligence with 3 components: Analytic/Academic, Creative, & Practical intelligences wherein only the analytic can be measured by Psychometrics.

Theory of Multiple Intelligences   
         Ø  In 1983, William Gardner proposed 7 forms of intelligences, namely:
                     §  Linguistic
                     §  Spatial
                     §  Bodily-Kinesthetic 
                     §  Musical
                     §  Interpersonal
                     §  Intrapersonal
                     §  Logical-Mathematical

         Ø  Gardner defines an intelligence as consisting of 3 components:

         1.       The ability to create an effective product/offer a service that is valuable in one’s culture
         2.       A set of skills that enables an individual to solve problems encountered in life
                  I.Q. (Intelligence Quotient) – is the capacity to solve problems and make things.
         3.       The potential for finding or creating solutions for problems which enables a person to acquire new knowledge

Moral Intelligence – it is the ability to decide and to distinguish what is right and wrong when one makes a decision. Every child is born with the potential of being genius but only 4-10% of it is being utilized.




Leave a Reply.